Designer Jessica Price reveals the backstory of sexism, homotransphobia and maltreatment of workers at the Paizo publishing house.

We are in a period in which the dirty clothes of playful realities are exposed on the street or, better said, on Twitter. And we stay here, sighing and wondering “Really? But seriously? But why are there so many assholes in the world of video games and role-playing games? ”.
Here, today is one of those days. And, for me as a writer, it's a particularly unpleasant day, because the dirty laundry belongs to one of the RPG publishers I'm most fond of.

In recent days, a former employee of the Paizo publishing house, Jessica Price, made a very long thread on Twitter, in which she revealed a whole series of toxic and / or dangerous situations and behaviors that the top management of Paizo have held towards him and other personnel.
In this article, we will try to lay out what Jessica Price said in an orderly fashion. But first, a little background.

Content Warning: this article will talk about poor working conditions, homophobia, transphobia, racism and sexism.

Paizo: what is it, what is it public and by whom is it formed?

For those who did not know it, the Paizo is an American publishing house, best known for having published three RPG franchises: the first and the second edition of Pathfinder, Star Finder. Founded in 2002, Paizo began by publishing the official magazines of Dungeons & Dragons, and then announced in 2008 the publication of the first edition of Pathfinder.

The publishing house was founded by Lisa Stevens, Vic Wertz and Johnny Wilson. The place della Paizo does not explicitly say who the staff of the publishing house is composed of, but some of their ads they make us understand who holds some key roles.
Currently, Lisa Stevens is the CEO, while Jeffrey Alvarez has the role of President. Erik Mona is Publisher and Chief Creative Officer and therefore takes care of deciding what will be published, while Jason Bulmahn he is director of the game design section. Instead, Vic Wertz (another of the founders and husband of Lisa Stevens) is Chief Technology Officer and oversees the official card game of Pathfinder.
He gives us some more information about the people who work at Paizo PathfinderWiki.

Who is Jessica Price?

Jessica Price is a 'editor, Writer e designer who has worked on several products over the past 15 years. She joined the Paizo team in 2013, contributing to the drafting of manuals for the first edition of Pathfinder and Star Finder.
Subsequently, Price also collaborated with Wizards of the Coast, especially with Van Richten's Guide to Ravenloft.
Outside the world of RPGs, Price was a narrative designer for the MMORPG Guild Wars 2, and before devoting himself to playful works he worked for Microsoft.

Price is also one feminist and spoke openly more than once of the sexism present in the videogame world, experienced both by her and by her other colleagues. It was also licensed by ArenaNet for pointing out to a Twitter commenter that he was mansplaining her, “teaching” her what Price literally is. His dismissal resulted a considerable debate overseas.

Jessica Price's initial tweet about Paizo
Jessica Price's initial tweet about Paizo

Jessica Price Reveals Paizo's Dirty Laundry: The Beginning

Now that we understand who the protagonists of this matter are, let's see how it all started.
Tuesday September 14, Jessica Price publishes the following tweet on the his Twitter profile:

Welp, Paizo just fired their two most senior customer service people (one a woman, one a POC) for apparently being too willing to push back on abusive management.
Of course, this also means that the last person they might retaliate against for me airing dirty laundry is gone.

So, Paizo just fired two of his oldest customer service employees (a woman and a person of color), apparently because they are too willing to object to abusive management.
Of course, this also means that the last person they could take revenge on if I exposed their dirty laundry is gone.

Who are the two people fired by Paizo?

Price doesn't mention names, but it looks like one of them is Diego Valdez, Which is also one of the authors di Pathfinder: Gods & Magic. Valdez, in fact, on his Twitter profile had announced, on September 13, that he would no longer work in the company where he had spent the last 7 years. Later, he specified that it was Paizo.
Thanks to Valdez's tweets we discover that the other person fired was his boss, Sara Marie.

A dismissal that took place in an unclear and transparent manner

Valdez reports that the dismissal came after three weeks of internal problems. Furthermore, it also appears that Marie's dismissal was conducted in an opaque manner. Valdez writes:

That she was fired, along with the cowardly nature in which it was carried out, and the misery my department has been put through had me especially frustrated and furious. I need for the people I work for to have some amount of managerial competence and integrity.
Yesterday, and the preceding 3 weeks made clear that the 2 mangers involved have none of either. I made clear that they are not worth working for and I will not work for them. Sara was fired, my exit was voluntary. I need that to be clear to everyone.

The fact that [Sara] was fired, along with the cowardly way it was done, and the sadness my department had to go through made me particularly frustrated and furious. I need to work for people with some managerial competence and integrity.
Yesterday and the previous three weeks made it clear that the two managers involved have neither one nor the other. I have made it clear that it is not worth working for them and that I will no longer work on them. Sara was fired, but mine was a voluntary exit. I needed it to be clear with everyone.

From Price's profile, then, we discover that the president of Paizo, Jeffrey Alvarez, had not told the other employees that Marie had been fired, but that she had left alone to look for another career.

Paizo's two major RPGs: Pathfinder and Starfinder
Paizo's two major RPGs: Pathfinder and Starfinder

Jessica Price reveals Paizo's dirty laundry: the treatment of employees

The dismissal of Marie and Valdez therefore prompted Price to reveal some background on how Paizo treats its employees.
Price states that in the Paizo there would be the idea that employees don't have to complain about anything. This attitude seems to go back to two of the founders of the publishing house, Lisa Stevens and Vic Wertz.

Okay, where to start. I mean, I have a million horror stories about the founders of the company, Vic & Lisa, such as Vic's violent rages that literally put a manager in the hospital…
Lisa's insistence that employees should not complain about anything, let alone that many of them could make more working at a fast food restaurant, because they should be honored to work on Pathfinder and willing to do it for free.

Okay, where to start? I mean, I have a million horror stories about the founders, Vic & Lisa, like Vic's violent scenes that literally sent a manger to the hospital ...
Lisa's insistence that employees shouldn't complain about anything, not even that many of them could make more money working in a fast food restaurant, as [employees] should be honored to work on Pathfinder and they should be willing to do it for free.

The refusal of the executives to clean the offices for seven years

Resuming his tweets from March 6, 2020, Price tells of the fact that the executives of Paizo they had not cleaned the offices where their employees worked for seven years. Price wrote in 2020:

I've worked at a lot of big game companies, and have friends at most of the ones I haven't worked at, and Paizo used to be better about some things but the way it treats its employees at this point is worse than the majority of them.
Like, they won't even follow health and safety requirements unless the employees force them too – they didn't clean (by which I mean even VACUUM) the carpet in the creative team area for seven fucking years. And then got pissy when wheezing employees collectively emailed HR.

I have worked for many large gaming companies and have friends in many of the ones I haven't worked for. Paizo tended to be better at certain things, but the way it treats its employees at this point is worse than many other companies.
Like, they don't even follow health and safety requirements, unless employees force them to. They hadn't even cleaned (and by that I mean VACUUM CLEAN) the carpet in the creative team's area for seven fucking years. And then they resented when employees who couldn't breathe alerted Human Resources.

The refusal of the executives to find a solution

Picking up on Tuesday, Price said some employees had asthma problems in their offices. So much so that I prefer to go outside in the spring, with the pollen, to be able to breathe.
Asking Erik Mona (Publisher and Chief Creative Officer) if the premises were cleaned, he replied that the cleaners had not vacuumed since they moved into the building seven years ago. Asking Jeffrey Alvarez (the president) to call someone to do the cleaning, Price was told that it was too expensive. Also, according to Mona, the employees couldn't clean the place themselves because the insurance didn't cover this business.

So, Price and other employees contacted Human Resources to complain about the problem. Only then did the Paizo executives find the money to clean the premises.

The reaction of the Paizo executives

However, after this event, Price received worse treatment from his superiors, who seemed resentful of his behavior. Price writes:

As always, I was pretty baffled by this. It was literally my job to make sure our products shipped on time, to try to make the team work as smoothly and efficiently as possible.
And it seemed self-evident to me that people who can't breathe can't work.

As always, I was quite confused by all of this. It was literally my job to make sure our products were shipped on time, and to make sure my team worked as efficiently as possible.
And it seemed obvious to me that if people can't breathe, they can't even work.

And again, this isn't a terribly dramatic story. It's petty and it's silly and it's boring. But it is one of the best indicators of the exec team's attitude toward their employees: their willingness to destroy the company's own productivity to prove THEY'RE in charge.

Again, this is not a dramatic story. It is mean, stupid and boring. But it is one of the best indicators of the executive team's attitude towards their employees: their willingness to destroy the productivity of their own company to prove that THEY is in charge.

The rhetoric of lazy employees as the seed of all evils

Price says the employees she worked with were very dedicated to their work, so much so that they were willing to go to the office on weekends to clean them. However, executives believed the shipping delays were due to the laziness of the workers, not their health problems due to the poor cleanliness of the workplace.
Specifically, according to Price, it was Lisa Stevens who had this idea:

But Lisa Stevens had this idea that if things weren't shipping on time, it wasn't because we were under-resourced, even when employees were in crunch mode year-round.
It was CLEARLY because the team was sitting around in hammocks with their feet up.
And so in our meetings, she'd rail about the need to "find the cancer."
The “cancer” being the employee (s) that weren't working hard enough.
Imagine referring to human beings who work for you like that.
And it's not like this attitude has gone away just because she's basically retired.

But Lisa Stevens thought that if things didn't ship on time it wasn't because we were too few, even when her employees were in crunch-mode all year round.
It was CLEARLY why employees lounged in hammocks.
So, in meetings he was cheered up about the need to "find the cancer".
The "cancer" was the employees who weren't working hard enough.
Imagine that you are referring to human beings who work for you in this way.
And it's not that this attitude has disappeared just because she has practically retired.

Jessica Price
Jessica Price

Jessica Price reveals Paizo's dirty laundry: Erik Mona between racism, skill and sexism

According to Price, Erik Mona (Publisher and Chief Creative Officer) is among the quietest and most empathetic executives at Paizo. Nonetheless, Mona allegedly had various problematic behaviors and attitudes.
Price says Mona has a passion for Victorian occultism and theosophy, and therefore her social media and office often featured symbols that made several employees feel uncomfortable, such as swastikas o iron crosses. Mona ignored employee requests not to have such symbols in her office, according to Price.

The mechanics of madness and mental illness

In addition, Price says he had several problems writing the manual Horror Adventures di Pathfinder, especially the way the mechanics of the Madness. Price writes:

...when his team was like, “hey, maybe we shouldn't be doing mechanics for mental illness and saying some forms of it make you CE? like maybe instead of a madness mechanic we could just do a stress mechanic? "
was like "I figure we've only got 3 or 4 more years before it becomes too politically incorrect to do madness stuff in our books so we need to milk it while we can."

… When his team said, “hey, maybe we shouldn't create mechanics for mental illness and say that some of their forms make you Chaotic Evil? Maybe instead of a mechanic of madness we could make one of stress? ”.
[Mona] used to say, "I think we only have 3 or 4 years before putting insanity stuff in our books becomes too politically incorrect, so we have to milk this cow while we can."

"Perhaps involuntary" sexism

In addition, Price says that in Paizo, employees always start working under the title of "assistant", even in the case of a role of responsibility. Furthermore, employees were offered lower pay than their colleagues. When she complained to Mona, he replied, according to Price:

"Well, maybe we just won't hire any more women if they're going to complain all the time."

"Well, maybe we shouldn't hire other women if they end up complaining all the time."

Jessica Price reveals Paizo's dirty laundry: Jeffrey Alvarez, between bullying and sexism

Price then goes on to talk about Jeffrey Alvarez, the current president of Paizo.
According to Price, Alvarez was the one women employees had to turn to if they were harassed at PaizoCon. However, again according to Price, Alvarez allegedly bullied a woman he worked with who he didn't like, enough to force her to resign. This bullying also included sending "gifts", such as a picture of a naked Medusa (because it reminded him of the woman) and a postcard with a picture of a vibrator, because the woman needed to relax, according to him.
Regarding Alvarez's advice at the conventions, Price says:

His advice, at pre-convention all-hands meetings, was "try not to put yourself in a situation where you might get harassed or assaulted."
And then Lisa [Stevens, la CEO edR] would chime in with, "and remember, you're there to make sure the attendees have a good time."
I don't know how you read that in any way OTHER than a suggestion that being harassed / assaulted was part of our jobs.

His advice, in pre-convention meetings, was: "try not to put yourself in a situation where you could be harassed or attacked."
And then, Lisa [Stevens, the CEO ed.] Intervened with: "and remember that you are here to make sure that the participants have fun".
I don't know how this could be read DIFFERENTLY from the suggestion that being harassed / assaulted is part of our job.

Jessica Price reveals Paizo's dirty laundry: Jason Bulmahn and the unsolicited advances

Later, Price also talks about Jason Bulmahn, the Director of Game Design at Paizo:

And oh, boy, Bulmahn. Bulmahn hit, as far as I can tell, on every woman in the creative department who wasn't in a relationship.

And oh, my, Bulmahn. Bulmahn tries, from what I have been able to see, with any woman in the creative department who is not in a relationship.

Price says she initially got along well with Bulmahn, who was known to be a difficult guy to work with. But some time later, Bulmahn pleaded to Price, who turned him down. At first it seemed like everything was fine between the two, but Price says he later found out that Bulmahn had told his team not to send her anything anymore and not to talk to her.
Price adds that she was scolded by Mona for ruining her working relationship with Bulmahn, and Price didn't tell Mona about Bulmahn's advances, as he was a close friend of Mona's and she didn't feel comfortable telling him.

Jessica Price reveals Paizo's dirty laundry: Tonya Woldridge's toxic behaviors

Price finally talks about Tonya Woldridge, Paizo's organized play manager.
Price says she invited Woldridge to a support group for women in the tabletop RPG industry, created by Price herself. In this group, several women (not only from Paizo, but also from other companies) complained, vented and sought support for the sexist attitudes they suffered in their work environment.
Complaints from some Paizo employees also emerged in this group, reporting Mona's toxic behavior, which we have seen above.
Price states that Woldridge had screenshotted the conversations in this group to go show Mona.
Since then, Price says she warned other Paizo women not to share sensitive material with Woldridge.

Help the violent, oppose diversity e

Additionally, Price reports other Woldridge problem behaviors:

But I heard a ton from organized play people about her protecting abusive volunteers because she was friends with them or they did work for her.
[...]
She actively opposed and attempted to quash the Paizo diversity blog. After an employee of color went and did it anyway and it got positive reception, she attempted to claim credit for it.
[...]

But I heard from a lot of people from organized play that she [Woldridge] had protected violent volunteers because she was their friend or because they worked for her.
[...]
She actively opposed it and tried to quash the Paizo diversity blog. After a black employee created it anyway and [the blog] elicited positive reactions, [Woldridge] tried to take credit for it.

Also, according to Price, Woldridge would try to force Paizo's customer service back to the office (presumably during the pandemic), as employees were "inefficient" while working from home. However, according to Price Woldridge, he did not bring evidence to support his argument and ignored employee requests.

One of Price's passages on the toxic behavior of Paizo's top management
One of Price's passages on the toxic behavior of Paizo's top management

How can there be so much bad stuff in a seemingly inclusive reality like Paizo?

This is a question that Price also asked. In fact, Paizo is known for being a very progressive and very LGBTQIAP + friendly publishing house. So how can such an environment hide, with such sexist and racist outings?

The contribution of individual authors and authors

According to Price, the matter is complex, so he writes:

No company's monolithic. WOTC's done some great stuff, and also some really not great stuff. And yes, in general, even Paizo's execs have been pretty sympathetic to LGBT issues, or at least LGB issues.
They published some very good trans representation when it was way riskier to do so, for example. That was the work of @AmazonChique [Crystal Frasier ndR], and it got protected and pushed through by Wes [F. Wesley Schneider ed.].

No company is monolithic. WOTC has done some very good things, and some very bad things too. And yes, in general, Paizo executives have also been sympathetic to LGBT issues, or at least LGB ones.
They released some very good trans representations as it was much more risky to give it, for example. It was the work of @AmazonChique [Crystal Frasier ndR], who was protected and pushed by Wes [F. Wesley Schneider ed.].

These tweets need a little outline explanation. @AmazonChique is the Twitter account di Crystal Frasier, game designer and transgender and intersex artist who worked for Paizo from 2009 to 2014, then from 2015 to 2018, and then for the Green Ronin (Mutants & Masterminds) and the WOTC (Van Richten's Guide to Ravenloft).
The nominated Wes, on the other hand, should be F. Wesley Schneider, one of Paizo's most prolific campaign writers, from 2003 to 2017.

The skepticism of the upper floors towards inclusiveness

However, according to Price, the drive for employee inclusiveness was not always shared by executives.

But Paizo execs have a habit of being, at best, skeptical of those efforts.
And often of actively punishing employees who push inclusion, then turning around and accepting the public accolades when they're well-received.

However, Paizo executives have a habit of being at the most skeptical of these efforts.
And they often tend to actively punish employees who push for inclusion, then turn around and accept public praise.

The merits of the Paizo of the past: being the first publishing house to take certain risks

Price continues his speech, noting how many of Paizo's past initiatives have been well done and courageous.

So, like, yeah, Paizo has published some really great, inclusive stuff, and often has been the first large company to do so.
And I think it was maybe less awful back in the very early days, and maybe the execs were a little less cowardly, because I do want to give Lisa credit for being willing to publish a gay paladin and his husband in Paizo's very first adventure path .

So, yes, Paizo did some very good and very inclusive stuff, and was often the first major publishing house to do so.
And I think things were maybe a little less bad in the early days. And perhaps the executives were a little less cowardly, because it must be admitted that Lisa [Stevens, the CEO] was willing to publish a gay Paladin and her husband in the very first Paizo Adventure Path.

The merits of the Paizo of the past: pushing for inclusiveness when it is not yet established

That was, of course, Wes's work, and every bit of it was very careful (not just inclusion of a gay character, but a gay * paladin *, the class you literally can't be unless you're lawful good, thereby insisting that being gay wasn't just tolerated, but compatible with strict good).
But I do want to give Lisa credit where it's due for greenlighting it, because while today that's no biggie, it was considerably riskier when they published it, especially given that the company was new and tenuous and needed the 3.5 audience to survive.

It was, of course, Wes' work, and it was all done with care. (Not only a gay character was included, but a gay * Paladin *, the proper class of only legal good characters. It was therefore insisted that being gay was not only tolerated, but also compatible with being good. )
But I want to give Lisa what's Lisa's, because she's okay with this. In fact, if it wouldn't be a problem today, a gay Paladin at the time was much more risky to publish, especially given the fact that the company was new and fragile, and needed the 3.5 audience to survive.

Merisiel and Kyra, Pathfinder's iconic thief and cleric, during their wedding
Merisiel and Kyra, Pathfinder's iconic thief and cleric, during their wedding

The limits of today's Paizo according to Price

However, Paizo's merits in the past do not hold up, given the problems the publishing house has today, as well as its attitude towards inclusion. Price writes:

But like a lot of TTRPG people from that era, the Paizo execs kind of went, "hey, we did that, and isn't that enough, and we're not so sure about a lot of this other stuff" and got kind of resistant to newer and younger devs pushing forward on other inclusion fronts.

But like many other people in the tabletop RPG scene of the time, the Paizo executives did that: “hey, we did those things, isn't that enough? And we're not sure about a lot of this other stuff. " And they resisted newer and younger writers, pushing towards new fronts of inclusion.

La Paizo "resting on its laurels"?

Price gives an example of the unwillingness of the Paizo leaders to deal with other progressive issues:

And it's gotten grosser in recent years. This past year they pushed back hard against a Juneteenth blog because they didn't want a focus on Black history and issues to “take away” from Pride. Which is, you know, an ENTIRE MONTH.

Things have gotten more disgusting in recent years. Last year they strongly opposed a blog on Juneteenth, because they did not want to put the spotlight on the history and problems of blacks, "taking them away" from Pride. Which lasts, you know, a WHOLE MONTH.

This tweet also needs a little explanation. The Juneteenth is a US federal holiday that celebrates the emancipation of African-American slaves. It is held on June 19, the same month in which Pride is celebrated.
Linked to that occasion, Price reports another unpleasant speech made by the Paizo executives:

when the employee said to the marketing guy, that he thought they needed to do better because Paizo had been coasting on its reputation for being an inclusive company for a while, the marketing guy told him "well, maybe we don't want to be positioned as that company. "

When an employee told the marketing guy that he thought they had to do better, because Paizo had settled on its reputation as an inclusive company for a while, the marketing guy told him, “Well, maybe not. we want to be known as that type of company ”.

Crystal Frasier, transgender and intersex game designer and artist, former Paizo employee
Crystal Frasier, transgender and intersex game designer and artist, former Paizo employee

The testimony of Crystal Frasier

Price's words received some echo and prompted other game designers to reveal more Paizo dirty laundry.
The first was Crystal Frasier, who on September 15 wrote a short series of tweets in response to those of Price.

Transphobic episodes in the Paizo household

So let's see Frasier recount some transphobic episodes:

Jess [Price ndR] hasn't even talked about how Paizo explicitly laid out different freelancing rules for their only transgender employee at the time solely because a queer employee made that manager uncomfortable and she didn't want her having outside opportunities.
Or how Paizo made employees double up in convention rooms, and refused to bring transgender employees to conventions (limiting career development and networking) because they wouldn't room a cis woman employee with a trans woman coworker even when they both said it was fine.

Jess [Price ed.] Didn't even tell how Paizo made different freelancing rules for transgender employees only at the time, just because a queer employee made her manager uncomfortable, who didn't want the employee. had possibilities on the outside.
Or how Paizo made employees sleep in double rooms, and refused to bring transgender employees to conventions (thus limiting networking and career growth) because they didn't want to put a cis employee in the same room with a trans colleague, even when they both said they agreed.

Inclusion as a work of employees, not managers

Paizo has a well-earned reputation for inclusion in mainstream tabletop. And all that is 100% the hard work of ground-level folks: developers, freelancers, and especially editors. Management views… well, the president still refers to gay employees as “little f * ggots”.

Paizo has rightfully made a reputation for its inclusiveness in mainstream tabletop RPGs. This is 100% hard work of simple employees: developers, freelancers, and especially editors. The administration's ideas… well, the president still calls gay employees "little fr * ci".

Crystal Frasier's comments on Price's Paizo allegations
Crystal Frasier's comments on Price's Paizo allegations

What to do now?

After reading this long confession by Jessica Price, the question arises: so what do we do now?
This is definitely a question that I have also asked myself.
You see, Pathfinder it was the second RPG I ever tried, and the first one where I did a proper campaign. I love Pathfinder (first and second edition) e Star Finder, I love their manuals, I love the characters, the classes, the races (and the ancestry) and the rules they propose.
I'm the kind of person who orders his manuals not from Amazon, but directly from the Paizo website, paying substantial shipping costs, in order to support a publishing house that, in my eyes, has always worked very well. Between me and my boyfriend, we will have almost € 1.000 worth of manuals Pathfinder e Star Finder.

However, I'm also the kind of person who can't let go of such situations.
If it had been just a single person's tweets, I would also have thought of a personal vendetta. But we are also faced with the testimonies of other people who have worked in the sector (such as the designer Robert Spookes). Moreover, by now knowing well that in the world of gaming (even role-playing) machismo, homolesbobitransphobia, and general poor working conditions are very common, reading a testimony like that of Price does not surprise me a little, unfortunately.
Then, how to reconcile love for Pathfinder e Star Finder with the need not to financially support a toxic company?

The reflection of Crystal Frasier

Crystal Frasier has some interesting thoughts on how to act

That isn't to say "don't buy their books and don't play their games." All companies are like families: some good people doing their best, some awful people usually in positions of power, a creepy uncle or two.
[...]
If you do interact with them, make your feelings clear: That you buy Pathfinder or Starfinder BECAUSE the queer and racial and accessible content is important to you, and that you want their employees to be treated better

This doesn't mean “don't buy their books and don't play their games”. All companies are like families: there are good people doing their best, and some horrible people usually in positions of power, and one or two slimy uncles.
[...]
If you are dealing with them [la Paizo edR], be clear: say you buy Pathfinder or Starfinder BECAUSE accessible queer and racial content is important to you, and that you want their employees to be treated better.

Jessica Price's reflection

Jessica Price also has some thoughts regarding the possibility of boycott Paizo products.
It is immediately clear that this is not a simple decision, and that it will have both positive and negative consequences:

I can tell you that company management tends to love it when the response to their abuse being revealed is "we can't boycott because that will hurt the workers."
Their victims become their human shield.
But it's also true. It's a crux I don't know how to resolve.

I can tell you that the management of companies tends to love when their abuses are revealed and the answer is “we cannot boycott it, because it will affect the workers”.
Their victims become their human shield.
But it is also true. It's a dilemma I don't know how to solve.

Thus, Price takes up another user's proposal and suggests they remember support those who create the content, not their employers. Therefore, the best thing to do is to support those who, in Paizo, create content even outside the official materials, making donations on Patreon and offering / suggesting job opportunities.

A small reflection for the Italian localization

For my part, I feel I can support Price and Frasier's proposals.
I will not stop playing Pathfinder e Star Finder, but I'll probably buy a lot less from the Paizo website and, when I do, I will remind them that their content creators are the reason they have my money, certainly not their executives.
Secondly, I will try to keep my ears open in case other former Paizo employees decide to report unpleasant or illegal situations. It is essential to give them space and resonance, so as to remind Paizo executives that public opinion is keeping an eye on them.

Thirdly, I would like to suggest a United Games, which localizes in Italian Pathfinder e Star Finder, to do some peer pressure against Paizo. Certainly, Giochi Uniti will not be able to break into the Paizo offices (but, at this point, does anyone really want to enter?) Threatening to burn the manuals in Italian.
However, Paizo could be reminded that improper behavior towards workers is not well regarded and that you want some kind of assurance that employees are treated well.

Pathfinder's iconic shaman, a transgender woman whose background was written by Crystal Frasier
Pathfinder's iconic shaman, a transgender woman whose background was written by Crystal Frasier

Some conclusive words

There is not much to say about this matter. Or rather, there would be a lot to say, but it would only repeat what Price said on Twitter.
Paizo appears to have presented the world with a progressive image that does not truly represent its leaders. Basically, we are facing another case of performative progressivism. According to what we have read, all that is inclusive in Pathfinder e Star Finder it is the work of employees who believed in their work and the importance of the content they created. Meanwhile, the working conditions, pay and environment made working at Paizo extremely unpleasant.
For my part, I am disappointed e embittered to discover the dirty clothes of "mamma Paizo". But I'm glad I got to know by name and face the people who really produced the content that made me fond of Pathfinder e Star Finder. Because these people deserve it. La Paizo, apparently, no.

I close the article with Price's final reflection:

I also want to say, if Pathfinder is special to you, if it helped you, if it was a safe place for you to be and grow and imagine, that is real and legit and none of this changes that. It was made by people who loved it.
And whether you keep playing it or find other games, I hope you continue to find joy in gaming. But I would also urge you to remember to love worlds and experiences, and not companies.

I would also like to say that if Pathfinder is special to you, if it has helped you, if it has been a safe place to be, grow and imagine, your experience is true and legitimate, and none of this will change that. Pathfinder was made by people who loved it.
And whether you keep playing it or find new RPGs, I hope you will continue to have fun playing it. But I also want to invite you to remember to love worlds and experiences, not companies.