I had already talked about Fear street, presenting it as a trilogy of horror films different from the usual and prone to good results; unfortunately, however, I had to change my mind. The possibilities were there, the story as well, yet it was decided not to surprise and to remain calm. It obviously remains a huge work in its development, innovative in some respects but tremendously already seen in others.

Obviously the following review is at risk spoiler for anyone who hasn't already seen the trilogy. If you don't want to spoil the surprise, then, give up!

Fear Street: A scene from the first movie
Fear Street: A scene from the first movie

Fear Street 1978: a quiet weekend at the campsite

Recipe for a good 80s horror horror: take a group of teenagers of varying ages. Season them together with a good dose of stereotypes and crazed hormones and leave to ferment in an isolated place, in this case a campground. About halfway through the preparation, add a very violent killer armed with a knife, a hatchet, a lawnmower or a chainsaw. Watered with copious amounts of blood and illogical choices. A pinch of erotic scenes (but just a pinch) and you have your movie.

Precursor and redundant elements aside, Fear Street 1978 is pleasant enough: there is a good cast, made up of well-known figures (Sadie Sink di Stranger Things, Gillian Jacobs di Visions) and other emerging ones, and a quality all in all above average. Too bad for the writing, very lazy, which falls into one of the most canonical horror ever, while the quotation is skyrocketing. Don't open that door, Jason, and in general everyone you find Wed.

Fear Street: a scene from the third film
Fear Street: a scene from the third film

Fear Street 1666: it's not The VVitch

So let's move on to the next chapter, which I found much more inspired: Fear Street 1666. The story is the classic one of the witch who is not actually a witch, with good twists, mysterious scenes that make the plot more compelling and a healthy angry crowd. and believer to act as a side dish. Unfortunately, although the setting is similar, we are very far from the feelings of The VVitch, with its dark, macabre and horrifying tones, and a more direct and concrete horror is embraced.

The story in 1666, however, does not last too long: it is still necessary to end the curse of Sarah Fier in the present; and therefore our characters (secondary and not) collide with the incarnate evil, to the sound of… shutters and liquidators. A final battle not so epic, therefore, despite the wait, but all in all in line with many other teen horror It Follow, eg). The curse is then broken and the town of Shadyside stops being cursed, becoming a very normal city.

Fear Street: a scene from the second film
Fear Street: a scene from the second film

A pleasant but far from perfect trilogy

After the trilogy, the time has come to do the math. Fear Street, with its three films, is certainly an interesting and compelling trilogy, a horror enough in the lines without extraordinary strokes of genius and amazing ideas. If taken individually, the films have nothing to envy to the films of the same category: united together, however, they manage to bring everything to a higher level that is certainly more compelling.

The trilogy, therefore, is saved from the scythe that I usually rest on the nape of horror films, although not free from defects, mostly concentrated in the structure of the film, in its recurring stereotypes and in its ending. To end the story started and seen in the third and last film with a classic clash of teenagers vs forces of evil is to kill all the climax that has been created; if you add comic clips and more lazy choices, you risk ruining everything. You don't get to this point, of course, but you pass close enough to feel the abyss, and it's something I personally would have avoided.